Top 7 or 10 Tips

Checklist for Hiring a Private Investigator


Looking for an old friend? Want to know if your spouse is cheating? Need to check out a potential tenant or employee?A good private investigator (PI) can help you obtain these answers. And as with any expert you hire-a doctor, a lawyer, an insurance broker-it benefits you to take the time to ensure you're hiring a professional who has experience, quality reputation, and good-business ethics.

The Top Ten Ways to Stop Procrastinating Now


10. Procrastination Condemnation - Lose the Labels! All those things you call yourself, such as lazy, scattered, disorganized, not good enough, incompetent, or stupid, for example, aren't helping you get things done, are they? You've learned to believe them, and you think they've become something of a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Surviving When Clients Arent Rolling In


As the holiday season starts to settle in, the workload for many Micro-Businesses can slow down.Service-based businesses in particular consider this a slow time of the year.

Seven Steps to Achieving Your Dream


"Vision is the spectacular that inspires us to carry out the mundane." -- Chris WidenerCan achievement be broken down into steps? Well, it isn't always that clean and easy, but I do know that those who achieve great things usually go through much of the same process, with many of the items listed below as part of that process.

Top 7 Ways to Profit from Foreign Trade


Here are seven excellent ways to earn income from international trade.1.

10 Things To Do When Business Slows Down Over The Holidays


I'm sure you've seen it happen every year: your business slows down during predictable times, like the summer vacation months or year-end holidays. For the self-employed who rely upon steady cash flow, this can be a disconcerting time.

Top 10 Ways to Use Quotations to Be Healthier, Happier and More Productive!


Most people have at least one favorite quotation from a famous or not-so-famous person. Some people collect them like baseball cards, figurines or classic cars.

Top 10 Tips on How To Write About Yourself


Many people find it really hard to write for business and marketing purposes about themselves and/or their product or service - much harder than it is to write about someone or something else. If that sounds familiar, read on; in this article professional business writer Suzan St Maur shares her top tips on how to write about yourself and what you do, efficiently and effectively.

The 10 Benefits of Cross Cultural Training


Cross cultural differences can and do impede upon communication and interpersonal relationships. In the business world this occurs daily, where people from different cultures interact and are expected to perform and make decisions.

Business Meeting Etiquette


Business etiquette is essentially about building relationships with colleagues, clients or customers. In the business world, it is these people that can influence your success or failure.

The Ten Best Kept Secrets For Protecting Your Business Property Against Theft


1. Locks and Padlocks - Locks on all outside entrances and inside security doors should be double cylinder deadbolts with removable collars.

10 Nifty Tips for Better Business Cards


Not having a business card is as bad as using an eMail address that ends in AOL.com It's just not professional.

Top 10 Stumbling Blocks that Limit Business Growth


Never in history have more entrepreneurs launched more new businesses! In America, thousands of business open their doors every single day! Unfortunately, most of them (over 90% of them) also close their doors within two years. Businesses are started with high hopes and glorious dreams.

Top 10 Steps to Build Your Professional Practice Now!


1. Examine everything in your office from the view of a new client! If necessary, spruce it up.

Top 10 Items to Review & Build Your Business Now!


In building and runnng an independent private practice or small business, there are many items that need to be monitored closely and should be reviewed periodically. Year-end is a traditional time do this, and this week's Letter is a "Top Ten" of items to review as the year draws to a close, or whenever you decide to pause, reflect, take stock and re-assess.

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Minimum salary threshold of £30k-a-year will also apply to migrants from the EU27

Sajid Javid is expected to publish a long-delayed white paper on Britain’s tough new immigration regime on Wednesday, as the prime minister seeks to build the case for her Brexit deal by pledging to “take back control of our borders”.

Related: Business leaders warn against plan to slash EU immigration to UK

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New York attorney general says charity functioned ‘as little more than a checkbook to serve Trump’s business and political interests’

Donald Trump has agreed to shut down his personal charity, the Trump Foundation, in the wake of a succession of scandals and a looming lawsuit which exposed a “shocking pattern of illegality”.

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The sentencing of Donald Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn has been delayed during a live-wire court hearing filled with stunning reversals in which the judge accused him of having “sold your country out”.

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Online presenter accused of affecting the country’s reputation after suggesting the outfit was ugly

A popular YouTube presenter is facing charges in Thailand after she criticised a Miss Universe dress that was designed by the daughter of the king.

Wanchaleom Jamneanphol, a popular online TV host, is facing charges under Thailand’s notoriously strict cybercrimes and lèse-majesté laws – which make it illegal to say anything negative about the monarchy – for her comments online describing a dress designed by Princess Sirivannavari Nariratana as ugly.

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Google breached suppression laws by sending out emails headlined with the name of man charged with backpacker murder

Google has been forced to explain to the New Zealand government why it breached the country’s strict suppression laws by naming the man charged with murdering British backpacker Grace Millane.

The company said it had occurred by mistake, but stopped short of apologising for the blunder. Senior policy manager Ross Young told media Google had acted when it had been made aware of the court order, four days after it was issued.

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  • Marshall’s Big was first female-directed film to gross $100m
  • From 1976 to 1983 she starred in ABC’s Laverne & Shirley

Penny Marshall, who starred in the hit American sitcom Laverne & Shirley before becoming one of the top-grossing female directors in Hollywood, has died at 75.

Marshall’s publicist said she passed away at her home in the Hollywood Hills, California, on Monday due to complications from diabetes.

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Macquarie University Chinese history lecturer Kevin Carrico subject to detailed reporting of his movements on a recent visit

When Kevin Carrico landed back in Australia on Monday after spending a week in Hong Kong, his friend sent him a link to the front page of a Hong Kong tabloid.

It was covered with pictures of Carrico and details of his trip.

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Russell Horning is credited with making the dance move a global phenomenon in 2016

A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of Russell Horning, aka the Backpack Kid, against a video game company, alleging they breached his copyright for including his signature dance move “flossing” in their wildly popular game Fortnite.

Horning, 16, is credited with popularising “The Floss”, and became famous when he did the dance on Saturday Night Live during a performance by Katy Perry in 2016.

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Country braces for snap election as parliament rejects minority administration

Belgium’s government of four years has fallen on the issue of migration after the country’s parliament rejected an appeal from prime minister, Charles Michel, for its support for a minority administration.

Michel was forced to offer his resignation to the King of the Belgians, Philippe, after the Socialist party, with support from the Greens, proposed a vote of no confidence in his administration.

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Language saying marriage was between ‘two people with absolutely equal rights’ was dropped due to public pressure

Cuba’s government has backed away from enshrining gay marriage protections in its new constitution after widespread popular rejection of the idea.

Gay rights advocates had proposed eliminating the description in the constitution of marriage as a union of a man and woman, changing it to the union of “two people ... with absolutely equal rights and obligations.” But the government said on Tuesday that language promoting the legalisation of gay marriage would be removed from the draft.

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Korean Air will increase penalties after 35 cases of fans buying tickets to get close to their idols before cancelling

The latest trick employed by K-pop fans desperate to get close to band members, which sees them buy expensive airline tickets and then abruptly cancelling their flight once they have taken photos of their idols, has prompted South Korea’s flagship airline to increase refund penalties for late cancellations.

Korean Air announced the decision days after three fans of the boy band Wanna One took their obsession to extremes, boarding a Seoul-bound flight in Hong Kong to take photos of the band’s 11 members. They then demanded that they be allowed to disembark just minutes before takeoff and that they be given a refund.

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After the Finnish city was razed to the ground by the German army in the second world war, architect Alvar Aalto rebuilt it to a reindeer-shaped street grid. Then Santa came to town …

As soon as you land at Rovaniemi airport in Lapland you see a reindeer. Not a real one, admittedly, but somebody in a Rudolf suit cheerily greeting passengers who have just arrived. A couple of miles from “Santa’s official airport” lies Santa Claus Village, an amusement park complete with elves, real reindeers, huskies, shops and restaurants that draws more than 600,000 visitors a year to this isolated spot at the edge of the Arctic Circle.

There are reindeer everywhere in Rovaniemi: humans dressed as them at the airport, real ones pulling sleighs at Santa Claus Village and statues of them throughout the city centre.

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Once a thriving, glamorous city, Venezuela’s capital is buckling under hyperinflation, crime and poverty

A portrait of Hugo Chávez and a Bolivarian battle cry greet visitors to the Boyacá viewpoint in the mountains north of Caracas. “It is our duty to find one thousand ways and more to give the people the life that they need!”

But as Venezuela buckles, Chávez’s pledge sounds increasingly hollow. Vandals have splashed paint into the comandante’s face and beneath him Venezuela’s capital is dying.

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For a trial period, cars are allowed in the fortified area, a move many feel does not go far enough

Kareem Talal twice helped to bring down the concrete walls surrounding Baghdad’s Green Zone.

In 2016 he was among thousands of angry protesters loyal to the Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr who broke into the fortified enclave that houses government institutions and foreign embassies.

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Most cities have not been designed with women’s safety in mind but, from Egypt to Rwanda, new technology, design and education are reducing the threat of violence on the street

Sexual violence has rarely been so high on the news agenda. Since allegations against the movie producer Harvey Weinstein started to emerge in October last year, the global problem has finally become a mainstream issue. The United Nations has estimated that one in three women have experienced physical or sexual violence, with 120 million girls around the world having been forced into sex acts.

The repercussions go beyond the physical and psychological toll on individuals who have been attacked. Harassment and fear of violence can impede free movement of girls and women and stop them reaching their full potential, both socially and economically. “If women feel afraid,” says Laura Somoggi, who manages the biennial Womanity award for the prevention of violence against women, “it could undermine their ability to work or go to school or university which affects their empowerment, their rights.” Fear of attack is a bar to women escaping poverty.

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As thousands gather for the first public viewing of Musk’s ‘loop track’, skeptics wonder whether it will live up to its promises

Elon Musk enthused that this was no ordinary tunnel opening, but something epic and “incredibly profound”. Skeptics wondered whether it was just a hyped-up coming-out party for a hole in the ground.

In the end, the first public viewing of Musk’s latest visionary project – an underground “loop” track that promises to revolutionize transport in the 21st-century city – turned out to be a grand mixture of imaginative futurism and showbiz razzamatazz, not to mention a showcase for a novel tunnel-boring technology that may be the most significant development of all.

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UN-negotiated ceasefire in Yemeni port city seen as litmus test for other measures

Residents trapped in Hodeidah were daring to hope on Tuesday that the misery facing the besieged Yemeni city was abating, after the first day of a UN-brokered ceasefire appeared to hold.

Both Houthi rebels in control of the city and forces loyal to Yemen’s exiled government agreed to a cessation of hostilities at midnight on Monday night.

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Ogoniland women produce most of the family’s food but the twin pressures of land grabs and pollution are making it impossible for them to survive

Two women pick a slimy path through a creek, prized by generations of their female forbears for its mangroves, which once provided an abundance of food.

The elder in orange, the younger in blue, they fail to find a single periwinkle snail, a single fish or a usable piece of kindling between them. Their feet struggle to take purchase on the mud, more slippery than it used to be.

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The region’s inequality and violence, in which the US has long played a role, is driving people to leave their homes

Jakelin Caal Maquín, the seven-year-old Guatemalan girl who died this month in US custody, is the latest victim of a long, dysfunctional relationship between the US and its southern neighbours that has cost countless lives over the past half century.

Related: Why did a little Guatemalan girl die after crossing the US border?

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A heatwave will descend over the centre of the country this week and continue into Christmas, the bureau of meteorology says

Most of Australia is set for a warm and dry Christmas Day, with the bureau of meteorology predicting temperatures as high as 40C in the north, between the high-20s and mid-30s in capital cities, and little chance of rain.

The bureau’s seven-day forecast for the holiday period says Perth, Adelaide and Darwin will have the hottest Christmas Day, at a maximum of 35C, while there could be rain in Darwin and Hobart.

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The Democratic Republic of the Congo goes to the polls on Sunday with 21 candidates running to replace Joseph Kabila, who has been president since 2001. The photographer John Wessels has been watching the campaign transform the streets of the capital, Kinshasa

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Trafficked to the UK and raped for years, Abdul became homeless, got involved in crime and was threatened with deportation

The Home Office has paid £30,000 to a victim of child trafficking who was held illegally in immigration detention for several months despite having refugee status and showing clear signs of having been tortured and abused.

Abdul* (not his real name) was about seven when he was trafficked into the UK in the mid-90s. He thinks he came from Somalia but is not certain. He lived with adults who pretended to be his family but who abused him physically and sexually. One attempt to escape failed when police sent him back to his abusers. Suffering serious mental health problems as a teenager, he became street homeless and addicted to drugs.

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Imelda Cortez, 20, faced an attempted murder charge under draconian abortion laws after being raped by her stepfather

A rape victim who was charged with attempted murder in El Salvador after giving birth to her abuser’s baby has been found not guilty and freed from jail.

Imelda Cortez, 20, has been in custody since April 2017 after giving birth in a latrine to a baby girl fathered by her abusive stepfather.

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Film explores how women on the streets of Freetown suffer extortion, exploitation and imprisonment because of archaic laws

Mariatu was 15 years old when her widowed mother died and she ended up sleeping rough on the streets of Freetown where she fell into commercial sex work.

Not long after, she was arrested for “loitering” and, unable to pay a police bribe, spent six months in an adult jail.

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From the flight of Rohingya Muslims into neighbouring Bangladesh to the journey undertaken by pilgrims travelling to the Ganges delta, the lives of migrants are celebrated in a series of stunning entries to a photography competition organised by Oxford University’s centre of migration, policy and society

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Negotiations between countries have stopped, raising particular concern for Canada as its relationship with US sours

Amid an increasingly bitter diplomatic feud sparked by the detention of a senior Huawei executive in Vancouver, a highly coveted free trade deal between Canada and China looks increasingly unlikely.

The arrest of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of telecom giant Huawei – and China’s subsequent detention of two Canadians – has halted negotiations between the two countries. And as the United States prepares to request Meng’s extradition in the coming weeks, China has vowed to unleash punitive measures.

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Russian media have seized on the yellow vest protests – but they don’t seem to have played a role in their genesis

Russian state television has spent much of the last two weeks playing up the chaos of France’s protests, continuing a trend of coverage that emerged long before troll factories and the modern era of “fake news”.

Seven years ago, the Kremlin-backed TV station Russia Today went all in on coverage of a leftist street protest in the west. Did Occupy Wall Street fit the Kremlin’s interests of showing a western nation in (relative) chaos? Yes. But at that time, few would have suggested that Occupy was anything but a genuine protest movement.

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Geopolitical and economic rivalry between China and the US – not a breach of Trump’s Iran sanctions – is what’s really behind Meng Wanzhou’s arrest

Blame the British, as usual. In 1807, in the midst of a struggle with Napoleonic France, HMS Leopard, a Royal Navy ship of the line, attacked, boarded and captured an American frigate, USS Chesapeake, off Norfolk, Virginia. The British claimed their action was justified by the presence on the American ship of four English deserters, whom they arrested. But, for President Thomas Jefferson, it was an outrageous, illegal infringement of the sovereignty and independence of the infant republic, eventually leading to the 1812 war.

It’s fair to say the Americans never forgot lessons drawn from the Chesapeake humiliation – and have been faithfully following Britain’s script ever since. As its power grew, the US, too, assumed the right to extend its national writ beyond its shores. One modern example is the way the US justice department ruthlessly pursues foreign nationals, such as the Scottish hacker Gary McKinnon, who are deemed to have broken US law. McKinnon’s extradition was ultimately blocked in 2012 by Britain’s then home secretary, Theresa May, after a public outcry.

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From Kevin Hart to Lena Dunham to Christmas songs, sometimes it’s a good idea to look critically at the past. But you can’t just ban everything

If 2016 was the year of the celebrity death, and 2017 the year of the celebrity sex scandal, then 2018 has been the year celebrities have been held to account for things they said in the past that no longer wash in these suddenly, if somewhat belatedly, enlightened times. Quite what to do next remains slightly TBD.

Many high-profile comedians have come under this kind of fire, from Sarah Silverman to Amy Schumer to Ricky Gervais, and last week it was the turn of Kevin Hart. He lasted precisely two seconds as the named host of the 2019 Oscars before his prior fondness for outrageously homophobic comedy, including a routine about how awful it would be to have a gay child, and his predilection for similarly hilarious witticisms on Twitter (including one tweet describing someone as looking like “a gay billboard for Aids”) were deemed, as the modern lingo goes, problematic.

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A selection of some of the planet’s most stomach-turning foods, including maggot cheese, fish sperm sac sushi and Chinese mouse wine, are on display in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition that aims to delight and disgust in equal measure. The Disgusting Food Museum displays dishes from around the world in a bid to challenge stereotypes about which ingredients one would consider to be disgusting

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Sarah Sanders struggles to answer questions about Donald Trump's apparently more favourable view of Michael Flynn compared with his former aide Michael Cohen, when both have cooperated with special counsel Robert Mueller. She says Cohen is known to be a liar before saying 'I don't see any reason to go beyond that comment.' Sanders continued to claim the FBI had 'ambushed' Flynn – contrary to Flynn’s own statements. Asked if Trump was concerned about Flynn lying to the FBI and working for a foreign government, Sanders said: 'Not when it comes to things that have anything to do with the president.'



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Watchdog organisation Border Violence Monitoring has published videos of Croatian police conducting apparent 'pushback' operations against asylum seekers in woods on the border with Bosnia

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Hungary's rightwing government has faced a rare sit-in by opposition politicians. About a dozen MPs spent the night in the state television headquarters, in Budapest, in a continuation of their demonstration against PM Viktor Orbán's policies

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Italy's anti-immigration deputy prime minister is Europe's most followed politician on Facebook, with 3.4 million followers. Matteo Salvini used live streams in the run-up to parliamentary elections to speak directly to his supporters and show, as he puts it, images 'they would never show' in the mainstream media

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Israel has signalled its displeasure with Australia's recognition of West Jerusalem as its capital. A minister close to Benjamin Netanyahu said it was a mistake to contradict the notion of Israeli control over the whole city

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Egypt has announced the discovery of a well-preserved tomb decorated with hieroglyphs and statues south of Cairo. Officials expect more discoveries as archaeologists continue to excavate the site in the coming months

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