Top 7 Reasons You Should Back Up Your Data Online!


How much is your data worth to you? In this modern electronic-age we rely more than ever on our computers to supply us with the information we need. Chances are every piece of data you might ever rely on to make an important decision has been reduced to a digital format and resides somewhere on your computer's hard drive. Improved functionality and productivity are the benefits, however, on the flipside, one wrong click, one nasty virus, one untimely power surge or unhappy employee and that data is gone forever!

Online backups (also called offsite or remote backups) are a great solution for almost any small business or individual computer user.

1. The Statistics say you should.

a. Among the companies that experience data loss, 50% never re-open and 90% are out of business within two years.

b. 20MB of accounting data takes 21 days and costs $19,000 to reproduce.

c. Causes of data loss - 42% Hardware Failure, 30% Human Error, 13% Software Corruption, 7% Computer Viruses, 5% Theft.

2. Easy. Online backups are a simple way to protect your data. Online backup services provide the software application, server space and customer service in one turnkey solution. There are no additional software applications or equipment specifications to learn. The installation and set-up is quick and painless. Your backups can be scheduled to run automatically at any time you desire. There is no media, tapes or hardware to deal with.

3. Security. Believe it or not, online backups are generally more secure than in-house backup solutions. If your computers or data are affected by natural disaster, power failure/surges, viruses, vandalism, theft, human error, etc., your in-house backup will suffer the same consequences. Another unfortunate thing about tape backups is that they are not generally encrypted, and not very secure. Almost anyone can read them and gain access to your clients, sales, prospects, notes, billing records, payroll, tax info, and anything else on your computer.

Online backups encrypt (up to 448-bit) your data before transferring it to the remote server. Most backup servers are housed in secure locations with security guards, generators and the latest state-of-the-art security technology.

4. Inexpensive. Online backups give you more "bang for the buck." Setting up a traditional data protection plan requires software, hardware, media and the man-hours necessary to set-up and protect your data on a daily basis. Online backups combine all of these functions in one easy service for a low monthly or annual fee.

The cost? If you or your staff spends as little as 10 minutes per day running a tape backup or burning a CD, figure just the cost of labor at about $100 per month. Add on top of that, the cost of CDs, or tapes and you're spending 4 or 5 times the cost of the average online backup fee, which requires "no time" daily once your initial setup is done. You can start an online backup account for as little at $5 - $15 per month.

5. Quick File Restores. In the event you need to restore your lost data, you simply select the applicable files or volumes and with a click of the mouse all of your data is transferred to its original location. Your data is ALWAYS available 24 hours a day - 7 days a week. You can recover a single file or all of your files in a matter of minutes. 6. Peace of Mind. Knowing that your data is safe, secure and always available is enough reason to check out an online backup solution.

7. The Alternatives. You can't afford the alternatives! Computer users spend millions of dollars annually to recover lost data. The data recovery industry is HUGE and continues to grow. Assuming that your data is even recoverable - expect it to be an expensive and time consuming ordeal. Obviously, it is best to be prepared in the first place.

Sol Spencer helps computer users have the peace of mind that only a secure, online backup can provide. What would you do if you lost all of your data today? With Safe Harbor Data, you can restore your entire computer with one download! Amazingly affordable and effective, Safe Harbor protects your data with state-of-the-art encryption. Whether you run an online business, work from home, use your computer for online banking, school or more, your data isn't safe until it is backed up and stored in a safe place away from your home or office. Get the peace of mind that comes with secure, online backup today for only pennies each day. www.safeharbordata.com">http://www.safeharbordata.com


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