Are You a Project Manager Or a Project Mangler?


Which one are you? An effective IT project manager, able to deliver software on time, according to specs, and within budget, or someone referred to by your peers as a project mangler? Find out with these Top 10 Signs You're a Project Mangler.

10. Your .mpp attachments are considered to be more harmful than the Netsky virus.

9. You think your job description is limited to running around and asking people "Are you done yet?"

8. Your record for the "longest consecutive number of days without changing your project plan" is 3, which was achieved over a weekend.

7. You don't publish your project plan for fear developers might find out what the REAL dates are.

6. When the first 90% of your project is done, the second 90% begins.

5. You couldn't write a line of code to save your life, yet you tell developers how long it will take them to complete their feature.

4. You only work from 9 to 5 but expect developers to work evenings and weekends to meet your deadlines.

3. Your best motivational skill: telling people you're working from home tomorrow.

2. You DO think that 9 people can have a baby in 1 month.

And the number one sign you're a project mangler...

1. Your name is R. U. Dunyet.

Luc Richard holds an MBA with a major in high technology. For the past 10 years, he's been managing the development of software applications. He is the founder of The Project Mangler (www.projectmangler.com">http://www.projectmangler.com), an online resource that publishes free articles, stories, and other ready-to-use tools to help developers, team leaders and managers deliver software projects on time, according to specs, and within budget.


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Amid meandering debate and partisan point-scoring the judiciary committee considered amendments to the two counts against Donald Trump

The House judiciary committee bore down on a vote to advance impeachment against Donald Trump on Thursday with a meandering debate, punctuated by moments of partisan repartee – and fleeting mentions of Bill Clinton and Stormy Daniels – over proposed amendments to two articles of impeachment leveled against the president.

The committee was expected to vote on Thursday afternoon to deliver the two articles, charging Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, to the House floor, where the full chamber could vote on whether to impeach Trump as early as Tuesday.

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Dawn body retrieval mission happening despite a higher than 50% chance the Whakaari volcano could erupt again

‘Absolutely heartbroken’: families mourn White Island’s victims

The eight-person recovery team is now on the island.

“The recovery team undertaking the operation to remove bodies on Whakaari/White Island have landed on the island,” said deputy police commissioner John Tims.

From Eleanor on the dock:

The families are now stepping off the White Island Tours vessel PeeJay and are being welcomed back to land by local Māori, who have brought flowers and balloons to comfort the families who have been up and at sea since 4.30am. People are embracing and crying in group hugs.

As well as the families, tribal elders from Ngati Awa are also disembarking from the boat, as are some of New Zealand’s most senior police officers.

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Campaigners frustrated at how women and indigenous people have struggled to have voices heard

Youth climate activists have called for a global strike on Friday to protest that human rights and social justice have been sidelined at the UN climate talks in Madrid, where governments look set to wrap up two weeks of negotiations without a breakthrough on the pressing issue of greenhouse gas reduction.

Campaigners have been frustrated not only at the slow progress of the talks but also that groups representing women, indigenous people and poor people have struggled to have their voices heard within the conference halls where the official negotiations are taking place, even while 500,000 people took part in a mass protest in the streets outside last Friday.

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Low turnout reflects widespread disaffection with election pitting regime loyalists against each other

An opposition call for a mass boycott of presidential elections in Algeria appeared to have succeeded on Thursday, as polls shut after a day marked by mass demonstrations, police clashes and a wave of arrests.

The turnout in the election appeared to be around 20% – a victory for the country’s pro-democracy protest movement, which has derided the vote as a sham.

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Leader says a report from an internal inquiry into Myanmar soldiers was due soon

In a defiant closing address to the UN’s highest tribunal, Aung San Suu Kyi has pleaded with its 17 international judges to dismiss allegations that Myanmar has committed genocide and urged them instead to allow the country’s court martial system to deal with any human rights abuses.

The 74-year-old leader of the Asian country informed the international court of justice (ICJ) in The Hague that she expected a report by an internal inquiry to recommend more prosecutions of Myanmar soldiers soon.

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  • Chilean cargo plane had 38 people onboard
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The Chilean air force has found the wreckage of the military transport plane that disappeared en route to Antarctica and recovered human remains from some of the 38 people who were on board.

There were no survivors, Arturo Merino, the head of Chile’s air force, told reporters.

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Company ordered to pay CasaPound €800 for each day the account has been closed

A civil court in Rome has ruled that Facebook must immediately reactivate the account of the Italian neo-fascist party CasaPound and pay the group €800 (£675) for each day the account has been closed, according to local media.

Facebook shut the party’s account, which had 240,000 followers, along with its Instagram page in early September. A Facebook spokesperson told the Ansa news agency at the time: “Persons or organisations that spread hatred or attack others on the basis of who they are will not have a place on Facebook and Instagram. The accounts we removed today violate this policy and will no longer be present on Facebook or Instagram.”

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Paramilitary forces deployed at demonstrations in north-east over bill excluding Muslims

Two protesters have been shot dead by police in the Indian state of Assam during unrest over legislation that will allow for Hindu but not Muslim migrants from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan to become citizens of India.

The citizenship amendment bill (CAB), passed by the parliamentary lower house on Monday and by the upper house on Wednesday night, has faced fierce opposition from indigenous people in the north-eastern states of Assam and Tripura.

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John Casson blames absence of strategic thinking about UK role in world

Britain has not made the running on any foreign policy issue since at least 2013 and suffers from a fundamental absence of strategic thinking about its role in the world, the most senior foreign policy adviser to David Cameron has said.

John Casson – who worked in No 10 from 2010 to 2014 before becoming UK ambassador to Cairo until last year – warned of a lack of confidence across Whitehall about Britain’s role in the world. “We see lots of actors smaller than us by most metrics making more of a difference because they have a clearer-eyed sense of their strategic intent and the power they hold,” he said.

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Employees at a fish farm in Vancouver intervened when an eagle tried to eat a large octopus, resulting in a battle

A bald eagle on Canada’s west coast has learned that its eyes may be bigger than its stomach after it was nearly drowned by an octopus it tried to eat.

After hearing shrieks coming from the water on the north-western tip of Vancouver Island, employees at a fish farm investigating the noises happened upon a bird and cephalopod locked in battle.

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The Union Carbide factory explosion remains the world’s worst industrial accident – but as its dreadful legacy becomes increasingly apparent, victims are still waiting for justice

The residents of JP Nagar have no way to escape their ghosts. This ramshackle neighbourhood, on the outskirts of the Indian city of Bhopal, stands just metres away from the chemical factory which exploded just after midnight on 2 December 1984 and seeped poison into their lives forever. The blackened ruins of the Union Carbide plant still loom untouched behind the factory walls.

Related: The Bhopal disaster victims still waiting for justice 35 years on – in pictures

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Photographer Judah Passow has documented those were affected by the Bhopal disaster 35 years ago, which killed an estimated 25,000 people ad has left more than 150,000 suffering from chronic medical conditions

Judah Passow has waived his fee for this work. Contributions to the Bhopal Medical Appeal can be made at www.bhopal.org

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Exclusive: With heatwaves predicted to worsen dramatically over the next 30 years, many big US cities are failing to fully plan to protect those most vulnerable to extreme heat

When heatwaves hammered US cities this summer, one of the hottest in recorded history, some city governments had plans in place to protect their most at-risk residents.

Philadelphia’s plan sent homeless outreach teams to distribute water and bring people to cooling centers. Austin’s plan suspended electricity shutoffs for low-income or fixed-income customers. Chicago’s plan dispatched building inspectors to monitor shelters and other buildings without air conditioning.

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Musicians say Porto’s DIY studio complex Stop is a crucial arts space in a city dominated by tourism, but authorities say it’s unsafe and must close

All photographs by Mark Scholes

A mile east of the Luís I Bridge in the middle of a residential neighbourhood in Porto, Portugal’s second city, sits a bleak and decaying building.

Initially a three-storey car park, then a thriving shopping centre, the building has more recently suffered from years of neglect. Its walls are sprayed with graffiti and plastered with stickers, and the windows are blacked out.

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BJP politicians have said ‘no Hindu family will have to leave India’ after national register of citizens

It was 81 days ago that Kamal Hussain Mondal, a 32-year-old brick factory worker from a remote village in West Bengal, took his own life. He had been a carefree man and attentive father to his two young sons, and was known throughout Soladana village for his devotion to his wife Khayrun Nahar Bibi. The pair had been married for 13 years but she spoke of their “puppy love”. He would feed her with his hands at mealtimes and on Sundays he would take her out on the back of his bicycle, telling others he loved simply riding through the fields together and chatting.

“He promised he would look after us for ever,” says Bibi. “But after he heard about NRC, everything changed and he fell into a deep despair. He told me: all Muslims are going to be driven from India now. They will lock us up or just kill us. Just wait and see.”

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Usman Khan killed two people in the attack last month after his release from prison

An investigation into Staffordshire police has been launched following the London Bridge attack last month in which a terrorist killed two people before being shot dead by police.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) has begun an investigation into the force’s role in the management of the attacker, Usman Khan, following his release from prison last year after serving a term for terrorism offences.

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EU leaders told that any delay risks compromising Caruana Galizia murder investigation

Malta’s prime minister, Joseph Muscat, should resign immediately to avoid risks of political interference with the investigation into the murder of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, the European parliament told EU leaders on Thursday.

Muscat, who is under fire over his role in the investigation, arrived at a summit of EU leaders in Brussels on Thursday.

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Fury erupts over Republican naming the alleged whistleblower who triggered the congressional investigation into Trump and Ukraine

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Things are about to get started again back at the Judiciary committee hearing. It’s really just a matter of time before the meaningful vote occurs, so we’ll just have to see how many amendments the Republicans attempt to introduce.

The House has passed a major piece on healthcare legislation during the Judiciary committee impeachment hearing break.

The bill, HR 3, passed by 230 votes to 192 mostly along party lines. It would lower the cost of prescription drugs by allowing government to negotiate prices with manufacturers. It makes major changes to the US government’s Medicare program by capping out of pocket drug cost expenses under to the program to $2,000 and creates new dental and vision benefits.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s bill would cap Medicare recipients’ out-of-pocket costs for medicines at $2,000 a year. It would use about $360 billion of its projected 10-year savings from lower drug costs to establish Medicare coverage for dental care, hearing, and vision, filling major gaps for seniors.

But the legislation has no chance of passing the Republican-controlled Senate, and the White House has issued a veto threat. Still, Democrats saw a victory in the message their bill sends to voters.

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In response to an article concerning the ongoing political crisis in Haiti, foreign minister Bocchit Edmond describes the administration’s efforts to build a unity government and move the country forwards

Your article states that Haiti’s crisis is far from over (Killers lurk in the shadows as Haiti chaos takes a sinister turn, 5 December).

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Exclusive: Complaints lodged with commissioner over potential breaches of privacy under Centrelink scheme

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner is examining complaints that people’s private information has been handed improperly to debt collectors under the botched robodebt scheme.

Guardian Australia has confirmed complaints have been lodged with the OAIC by a number of people about potential breaches of their privacy.

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If Washington wants to be on the right side of history, it must open the way for Sudan to receive economic support

Over the past year, the Sudanese people have staged a near miraculous revolution, overthrowing the 30-year dictatorship of President Omar al-Bashir.

Following mediation led by the African Union and Ethiopia, a transitional government consisting of civilians and military generals is headed by Abdalla Hamdok, a veteran economist untainted by the decades of corruption and misrule. It is the best compromise: the army, and especially the paramilitary Rapid Support Force, are simply too powerful to be removed from politics in one fell swoop.

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Borrowers have accused NGOs of charging unfairly high interest, demanding rapid payback, and reporting debts to the police

The world’s largest NGO has been forced to conduct an internal review of a money-lending scheme it runs for the poor in Sierra Leone after some borrowers amassed significant debts and were reported to police when they couldn’t repay loans.

A Guardian investigation into a microfinance programme run by Brac found that the NGO’s staff were failing to fully explain the conditions of the loan to borrowers, or ensure they could afford the high interest rates associated with such loans.

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Hilton and Intercontinental among 12 hotel chains named in litigation claiming signs of sexual exploitation were ignored

Hotel brands owned by Hilton, Intercontinental and Best Western are among a number of leading global chains accused of profiting from sex trafficking.

In a landmark case that lawyers claim demonstrates “industry-wide failures” to prevent sex trafficking, it has been alleged that women and children were held captive, abused and sold for sex in their guest rooms across the US.

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Southern Africa’s third largest economy is a textbook example of the increasing debt facing a fast-growing continent

Zambia’s capital, Lusaka, was having a power cut, so the only light in the restaurant was from Fumba Chama’s mobile phone. The rapper, better known as PilAto, had just finished uploading a new track to Twitter. The bitter-sweet lyrics (in Bemba) of Yama Chinese describe the concerns of many Zambians: “They put on smart suits and fly to China to sell our country. The roads belong to China. The hotels are for the Chinese. The chicken farms are Chinese. Even the brickworks are Chinese.”

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Humanitarian agencies say Rohingya people displaced by violence in Rakhine state are forced to live under severe restrictions

The UK has broken ranks with the UN and will keep funding “closed” Rohingya camps inside Myanmar despite fears that doing so may entrench “apartheid-like” conditions in the country, the Guardian has learned.

Internal briefing documents as well as interviews with UN and humanitarian agency officials in Myanmar showed the British government was maintaining a policy of providing aid and other support to displaced people living in camps in Myanmar’s Rakhine state that have been slated for closure since 2017.

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New Zealand’s accident compensation scheme covers cost of treatment for all injuries and bars victims from taking legal action against operators

In New Zealand, where bodies still lie on a volcano after Monday’s eruption and survivors fill hospital burns units across the country to capacity, questions are mounting about who exactly was responsible for the safety of tourists on Whakaari or White Island, and, if failings are found, who will be held accountable.

Questions are also being asked about the wisdom of allowing tourists on to the island while it was assigned a volcanic alert level of two out of five, signalling volcanic unrest – a practice that has happened for years.

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Myanmar leader tells court in The Hague that civilian deaths were not genocide but part of a civil war

She might have been saving her best defence for the highest stage of all. But the arguments advanced by Aung San Suu Kyi at The Hague in response to allegations including genocide were much the same as the Burmese leader has been making for years. Most had been discredited long before she delivered her 20-minute address at the international court of justice on Wednesday morning.

There had undoubtedly been violence in the country’s restive northern Rakhine state, Aung San Suu Kyi told the judges. Armed groups had attacked the Burmese army, which had responded with force, sending more than 700,000 Rohingya fleeing to Bangladesh. But she challenged the idea that the military’s actions were carried out with genocidal intent – “to destroy the Rohingya as a group, in whole or in part”.

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Bloc considers itself international leader on environment, but progress has been stunted

The European Union considers itself as a leader on the environment and not without cause: policymaking in Brussels moved ahead of the international consensus in the 2000s.

But the soaring rhetoric has not always been matched by the necessary structural changes in the way European economies work and citizens live their lives.

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White Island’s eruption is a reminder that we are not nature’s master, but at its whim

At 2.11pm yesterday, as the Whakaari eruption was happening, I was out mowing my lawns. From my home at Te Kaha, a tiny settlement on the North Island’s east coast, you can make out the volcano’s sunken crater. The 300-metre dust cliffs frame the northern and southern edges, and in the centre is an east-facing pit where ancient birders and old sulphur miners once did their work.

On Monday the only workers and visitors on island were tour operators and tourists, several whom never made it back from yesterday’s destruction.

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Fishermen on Canada’s Vancouver Island have filmed the moment they rescued a bald eagle from the grips of an octopus’s tentacles after the bird of prey tried to attack it. The footage shows the fisherman removing the bird from the octopus's tight hold, before they release it back to safety

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A four-hour long gun battle which left six people dead started as a targeted attack by two suspects on a Jewish kosher market in New Jersey, say officials.

Police in the New York metropolitan area were put on high alert to protect Jewish neighbourhoods after the attack

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Donald Trump addressed a boisterous crowd in Hershey, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night. While the president wore a sober navy suit, his supporters chose more partisan attire

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Aung San Suu Kyi has dismissed allegations of state violence against Rohingya Muslims at The Hague. Speaking on the second day of hearings at the International Court of Justice in the genocide case against Myanmar, the country's de facto prime minister denied there had been genocidal intent in her government't treatment of the Rohingya and blamed the conflict on an uprising by separatist insurgents

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Sarah Stuart-Black at New Zealand's civil defence ministry says recovering the bodies of those killed on Whakaari/White Island is 'an absolute imperative'. John Tims of New Zealand police says the resources are standing by to go back to the island 'as soon as we are confident there are no risks'. Conditions on New Zealand’s Whakaari/White Island have worsened, hampering the retrieval of those killed in Monday's volcanic explosion. Volcanologist Graham Leonard says volcanic activity has increased at the site and that there is a risk of another eruption like Monday’s. Leonard also says it would be challenging for rescuers to breath, see or walk on the island given the current activity.  


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House Democrats have introduced two articles of impeachment against Donald Trump for high crimes and misdemeanours. At a press conference announcing the move, the House judiciary committee chair Jerry Nadler accused the president of betraying public trust and endangering US national security to benefit himself

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The families of those missing after the White Island eruption in New Zealand say they are 'standing together' as they wait for information about their loved ones. Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand's prime minister, said the scale of the disaster was 'devastating' and that reconnaissance flights had found no sign of life on the island. Police have launched an inquiry into the eruption after at least six people died and many more were injured

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